Get the Right Advice

Decisions

Everyone knows that December starts the holiday season, but for movie fans, it’s also the start of awards season. A slew of great movies are coming to theaters near you, from the historical thriller Marshall to the crime satire Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri. But few movies have gotten more press than Lady Bird, a coming-of-age story that’s now the highest-rated film ever on Rotten Tomatoes.

If you don’t know, Rotten Tomatoes is a website that compiles film reviews. It judges if they’re mostly good or bad, and then comes up with a composite score for a given movie. The idea is that if you go on the site, you can tell if you’ll like the movie by just looking at one number. Since that number is based on reviews from dozens of trained film critics, it should be a perfect barometer for every movie’s quality. Right?
What about differences in taste, or movies that have some great parts and some crummy parts? A lot of critics can’t stand Rotten Tomatoes, because it reduces their full articles down to just a few snippets and a number. Rotten Tomatoes does let you see how a lot of people feel about a movie very quickly. But, does getting more advice always mean that you’re getting better advice?
Of course not. While it’s good to get condensed information, you need the whole picture to make an informed decision. What you need is an in-depth analysis, tailored to your tastes and given to you by someone you trust. That’s true when you’re talking about film critics, but it’s even more true when you’re talking about financial advisors. We know that it’s part of our responsibility to guide you to a financial future that lets you retire and enjoy time with your family and friends. But we also know that everyone’s financial situation is different, and everyone needs different kinds of advice – advice that’s personal, in-depth, and more than just a bunch of numbers.